Re Purpose Coffins?

Last month I wrote about environmental options within funeral service. This week I came across possibly one of the most sensible environmental options available and its been right in front of us all the time!

Coffin manufacturing has changed a great deal over the past century, I remember my grandfather making coffins from solid timber and without modern manufacturing techniques had to use hot water in order to bend the shoulders into coffins. Paper laminates, custom and particle board just didn’t exist. Polishing or finishing was applied often by hand, using traditional french polishing techniques.

In todays coffin manufacturing  environment , high tech is the way to go, with computerised cutting machines and a variety of timber variants available. Yet ,whilst the manufacturing  techniques may have changed , there is still waste from off cuts and damaged timbers or veneers that typically end up in land fill.

Innovative family owned Melbourne coffin manufacturer RH Minter, has decided to do something about it. They are re purposing what was once waste into environmental low cost affordable coffins. While these unpolished rectangular coffins, sometimes have different panels and are possible not for every family (in regard to traditional looks) they definitely  lead the way in environmental re purposing.

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Manging Director of Robert Nelson Funerals, says “families now have a real alternative when considering environmental options and even better it locals that are doing it.”

“Compared to cardboard, that has to be manufactured, (often overseas) these timber off cuts are already in the local factory and would be shipped out for land fill if not reused.”

Robert Nelson Funerals are pleased to offer these environmental  repurposed coffins as part of our standard range.

Call Robert Nelson Funerals for further information. Ph (03) 9532 2111

 

 

Leave It To The Funeral Director

When we were working through the town planning process for our new funeral home, I was expressing my frustration to our planner over the lack of understanding from some of the council regulators. My planner said this, “Robert, your industry is so unique that in a planners entire work life, they may never be involved in the planning process for a funeral home and so therefore how could they begin to know”.

It got me to thinking of all the people we deal with and how many may have the same lack of understanding about what we do.

Often some of my acquaintances will yell out in semi humorous way and with a wry smile ” hey, have you buried many lately”. I politely smile in return. Yet, when we look at this statement, in our State, Victoria, the greater percentage of people are cremated rather than buried with figures nearing 60% or more in some areas. So the statistical chances of me conducting a  burial may only be four out every ten deaths. Maybe the correct question should be,”have I done many cremations lately?”

But, these wry questions and answers underpin the fundamental lack of understanding of what it is that funeral directors actually do.

Put at its simplest there are two main functions funeral director performs.

  1. Practical Functions
  2. Administrative functions

Practical functions the funeral director may perform include collection of the body, storage and preparation of the deceased, casketing, duties on the day of the funeral and any other associated events. Many people think this is all the funeral does.

Senior people casual greeting shaking hands
Expierence, Knowledge & Understanding key elements  required in selecting a Funeral Director

Administratively there are equally as many tasks, organising cemeteries, crematorium, doctors, Celebrants, music, flowers, Audio visual, printed materials, registration documentation and all the associated forms that go with each pratcial function and then keeping everyone informed

Yet, whilst these tasks can be rambled off in a paragraph or two many of these function, individually can take many hours to perform and some require extensive training. The role of the professional funeral director is to keep all the functions moving along and synced to ensure the funeral and associated services go off without a hitch often all within the space of a few days.

While from time to time some families wish to be involved in some of the technical aspects of the funeral some parts are best left to the funeral director.  I recall a funeral where a particular family member wanted to be in charge of the order of service. Problem was they were the last to arrive at the funeral and the order of services were handed out to the seated congregation at the last moment. Funeral Directors are trained and have the experience and knowledge to avoid these types of errors. From a funeral directors point of view nothing can be left to the last minute to organize, as this is when errors occur.

The mortuary  is often a misunderstood and maligned area of understanding. Mortuary personal typically have spent more than two years in training before gaining their qualification. Sadly, in Australia most funeral homes operate without any formal mortuary training what so ever. The work of an embalmer is rarely known and although at times can be unpleasant, the skilled practitioners takes great solace in the knowledge that their work is invaluable in helping families work their way through the grieve process.

So while families may wish to be involved in some of the preparations before a funeral many tasks are often best left to the funeral director to avoid unnecessary errors or mistakes. How, do I find out how I can help, just ask your funeral director, they should work with you to accommodate your wishes.

Sadly in recent times with the increase in price conscious clients some funeral homes offer little in the way of experienced, knowledgable and proficient staff. Only recently I was told of one funeral home offering cash incentives for the celebrants to do everything from collection of the deceased to documentation, bookings and

assisting at the funeral itself. This type of funeral model rings alarm bells and it should with you to.  So when your select a funeral director, ensure they have the skill, knowledge, expertise and qualifications to look after you.

Robert Nelson is managing director of Robert Nelson Funerals. Based in Melbourne, he is a fifth generation funeral director with over three decades of experience. A qualified Embalmer and member of the British Institute of embalmers, Past President of The Australian Funeral Directors Association (Victorian Division), past deputy chairman Australian Institute of Embalmers, he has travelled and studied extensively throughout the world in numerous disciplines.

A New Year, Time To Start Planning

On New Years eve many people make a resolution, yet while it is a common tradition some reports claim only 8% of these resolutions are ever kept. Yet, whilst it is easy to get caught up in the frivolities of the occasion, the new year provides a great opportunity to plan the year ahead.

We plan, with insurance for our cars, our house and often our life. We organise wills, superannuation and financial planning. Although, pre planning your funeral is probably not on the top of your list, it is worth considering why it may be for some.

Pre planning or pre paying for your funeral is not a new concept and has been in Australia for the best part of a century in various forms. In more recent years we have been flooded on morning TV with funeral insurance and the so called benefits of it. However, Funeral Directors generally don’t regard this as funeral pre planning as the funeral is never actually pre planned and paid for.

Funeral pre planning typically involves sitting down with your funeral director and working through all the items and services you would want for your funeral. This way the client can ensure the burial or cremation services are meaningful, appropriate and affordable to their unique needs.

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Pre Planning is simple

The funeral is costed at todays price and paid for. Cemetery or crematorium fees may be pre paid directly with the cemetery or crematorium and can be organised by your funeral director or paid direct. The balance of the funeral funds are invested in a funeral bond in the clients name and assigned to the funeral director on the death of this person. This way the funds are secured, held at arms length from the funeral director and capital guaranteed.

The funeral director will issue a contract showing all the goods and services pre paid and the monies paid.

So why would you consider pre planing your funeral?

For many its simply a matter of “Peace of Mind” . So that your family is not burdened with the expense and not knowing your wishes at the time of your death. Robert Nelson, from Robert Nelson Funerals says “that for many pre planning your funeral is about planning for the future so that people can get on and live their life, knowing all their affairs are in order.”

Mature surfer ready to catch a wave
Planning ahead means you can get on with life knowing all your affairs are in order

For others it may be because of some of the financial benefits of pre paying your funeral. On 1 January 2017 the Australian Government implemented changes to the assets test used to calculate pensions. Investments of up to $13,000 (current threshold for the 2018-19 financial year) in a funeral bond such as the Bendigo Funeral Bond, are exempt from Centrelink and the Department of Veterans’ Affairs income and assets tests. For more information on these changes to the pension assets test, you should contact Centrelink, Department of Veterans Affairs or your Financial Adviser.

So what does it mean when your funds are capital guaranteed?

It mean your original and subsequent net investments plus declared bonuses are guaranteed upon your death.

Finally, once paid you have nothing more to pay at the time of death for your funeral. The  funeral directors contract provides a guarantee that your original investment will cover the cost of the funeral into the future.

So if its “peace of mind”, getting your finances in order or it seems just the right thing to do at this time, call Robert Nelson Funerals and discuss your requirements.

 

 

Funerals By The Bay

“I have lived my whole life near the water, swam surfed, sailed. It’s where I met my wife, we even got married on the beach. The water and the beach mean a great deal to many people and are often very much part of our lives.” Robert Nelson – Managing Director, Robert Nelson Funerals

As larger number of families now seek more meaningful and relevant ways to farewell their loved ones, we have seen an in increase in alternate funeral venues.

Across Melbourne, Funerals are now being held in , parks, gardens, beaches, golf, bowls, and yacht clubs, reception venue, vineyards, restaurants and the list keeps growing. Increasingly larger numbers of venues are finding families, not only want the wake or refreshment services at their location, but also have the entire funeral, to save mourners having to drive to a different locations across the city.

With this in mind Robert Nelson Funerals has introduced “Funerals by the Bay”, Funerals that are held in bayside locations around Port Phillip  Bay. Most locations have sweeping views across the Bay with sand only meters away. Robert Says “typically families that have an association with the water choose the Funerals By The Bay Option”. Whether it be sailing fishing or generally loving the water, these are the types of people that choose these locations for funerals, memorial services or wakes.

_DSC4490-Edit_2800North 2“Funerals By the Bay” by Robert Nelson Funerals at Sandringham Yacht Club provide families with a complete funeral service package, with options that include not only all vital aspects of the funeral service, including, the coffin, cremation fees, certificate fees, funeral director fees, etc, but also venue hire, catering and audio visual all in one complete price option. If its a memorial service (no coffin present) or the wake after the funeral service, Sandringham Yacht Club provides a wonderful choice.

Robert says people are often surprised at how reasonable the costs are to have the services in these locations.

It’s not only members of the club that can have their funeral at the yacht club, but non members are also welcome to have their final send off at this beautiful club too. The club has extensive food and beverage options for the gathering at the conclusion of the funeral service.

Some families also choose to have their loved ones cremated remains scattered at sea and this can be arranged also.

If you have attachments to other bayside areas in Melbourne and the Mornington Peninsula talk to us about Funerals by the Bay at Mornington, Port Melbourne, Brighton, Parkdale, Williamstown, Altona, and St.Kilda